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in terms of moral absolutes with the united states being an absolute good. this contributes to the fourth issue, which is missing blowback. and fifth and finally, i don't think you talked about this as much, a belief that speedy change to political regime social security both desirable and possible. so i guess the question i have for you is if we follow's john's argument the cold war was a farce, does that invalidate these lessons? does it validate the lessons learned or mislearned? particular on the at the scream change, i realize it's a draft you mentioned in passing, i was quite interested to know in passing, you mention regime change as a possible outcome. in other words, you talk about it as being quite feasible tv a long-term commitment so. in other words, you talk about regime change as something that is quite possible to achieve, it just wasn't done properly recently. is that your view, and if so, how does one achieve regime change? and then the questions that came from on high via the internet ether is who would apply the same critique of faulty lessons to the bush 41 or clinton
of radicals. it indicates that radicalization of violence are taking place in the united states. one year ago, the department of homeland security issued a warning lead to an al qaeda plot against a railroad and commuter network. it linked to a new yorker who radicalized the violence around new york city before travelling to pakistan to seek out an opportunity to court is a paid in violent issue had -- violent jihad. four men were outside a community center in riverdale. they were radicalized in the united states. july 2009, seven men were arrested by authorities in north carolina. they possess weapons and 27,000 rounds of ammunition with plans to attack the marine base in virginia. they were inspired by al qaeda and radicalize in the united states. this past september, a man was arrested as part of an al qaeda conspiracy to attack locations in new york city with hydrogen peroxide based explosives. it was one of the most serious plot sense of 9/11. he lived in the united stated during his formative years before departing for pakistan. later that same september, a 21- year-old from new york's
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
emigrating to the united states. it was a great magnet for talent for canada. i came and went to graduate school in the united states. ended up owing $500 to my law school and i had like a -year-old chevrolet and had a wonderful experience in this country. it is open in many ways, that are so unique to this country and to this culture and it was pacific northwestly clear to me why anybody with energy and talent would want to move here, because of the opportunities that were created not just in terms of economic opportunities but just in general. -- perfectly clear to me why anybody with energy and would want want to move here. it was much less -- there is much less prejudice in this society. merit and talent was a much more important quotient but have i to say that despite all of this experience that would have and has made me very optimistic on so many levels, i have developed an increasing sense of pessimism about where we are going in the future. future. . re ng in the future. the main reason for that, frankly, is the propensity of the american system now to produce weekly -- leadershi
the united states and cuba. a key congressional committee is discussing lifting the ban on americans traveling to cuba. could the embargo fall next? we talk to the committee chairman and to a leading human rights advocate with a scathing report on cuba. plus, differing viewpoints from two officials who have just returned from there. >>> but first, cnn's nick robinson reports on the new robotic warfare over afghanistan and pakistan. it's conducted from thousands of miles away in suburban america. >> reporter: look around this room. it's been hit by a missile fired from an unmanned aerial vehicle, a uav, more commonly known as a drone. the family living here say children were killed in this u.s. attack. the children were never the target, but in pakistan's tribal border region, the death spelled trouble for u.s. foreign policy. where many believe that fighting with drones is cowardly. >> last year, one of the most popular songs in pakistani pop culture was a song whose lyrics talked about how america fights without honor. >> reporter: launched from just over the border in afghanistan,
and representatives. there are more women serving at any time. there are 17 women serving in the united states senate and 74 women serving in the united states house of representatives. of those congresswomen currently serving, 14 are currently members of the c.b.c. since the first representative of color, patsy minching of hawaii won election in 1964, a total 39 women of color have served. 30 of these women were elected after 1990. and a total of 38 have served in the house of representatives where carol mostly brown of illinois is the only women to serve from 1993 to 1999. the first african-american was sharle chisholm. and there are some states who have never elected a woman to congress, delaware, iowa, mississippi and vermont and i look forward to having women from those states join us at some point, madam speaker. there are historic number of women currently serving in congress, including the first woman speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, who was elected speaker in 2007. the 111th congress understands that our nation's laws must include and respond to all our citizens, including women. women in
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
how the united states may change this influence, address this national security deficiencies him and provide global leadership in an era when the american economy may not be the overwhelming source of power it once was. increasingly, national influence will be determined by whether the countries can contribute to solving global problems or at lease whether they are making themselves indispensable to other nations. china and other developing economies are demanding a greater say in the management of the world economy through the g20 and other mechanisms. china's global leverage has increased as it liberally positioned itself as a creditor nation with more than 20% of the world current account balance surplus. we cannot depend invasively on china investing heavily in the united states government that. some thought must be given to how we work with china and other nations to establish a more sensible global balance that depends less on demand by american consumers. the united states in the g20 also must rethink the role of the international financial institutions that provide crisis
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
>>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show wan exclusive interview with maziar bahari "the newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he's written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new deli where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmolian singh. let's get started. everyone has forgotten you, those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confine in the an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek" he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to $300,000 american dollars. he flew back to his home in london just days before his wife paola ga
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
karzai can become the effective leader that the united states hopes for and needs in afghanistan. can he rid the country of corruption? can he raise an army capable one day of taking over from the unitedtates? these are all key questions as president obama plans the next phase of u.s. involvement in afghanistan. in our lead focus, the afghan election and beyond. we start in kabul with jonah hull of al jazeera english who found that the issue of fraud remains an undercurrent. >> reporter: just a day after dr. abdullah's withdrawal from the race, hamid karzai is declared winner of afghanistan's presidential election. >> translator: we declare mr. hamid karzai, who got the majority votes in the first round, and who is the only candidate in the second round, be declared president of afghanistan. >> repter: the chairman of the country's top electoral body, the independent election commission, said consensus had be reached among his commissioners baseon the law and in the interests of the afghan people. international reaction was led by united nations secretary ban ki-moon in kabul on an unann
and come to the united states and harm us physically or our nato allies or others. that's our quest. now can that quest be coupled with the ideas for nato -- schools, building a police force that is not corrupt, but also is efficient, and to do this in a country in which the literacy rate is so low, the poverty is so endemocratic. the whole traditions of dealing with money as to who your friends were is really so much a part of just existing. i think for the moment, the president from press accounts is looking at it province by province. he's looking at being in the medium-sized cities as well as the hamlets in the country. how does this match up with what we are doing with a line drawn by europeans a long time ago to divide the countries? do we understand the poshtoon culture? well, yes and no, and we're all learning fast, including the president, but i think we are learning. if the president does come forward with a plan or plans, he must make that very specific. and that is a very big quest. it will not do to have a tentative feeling that now you see if, now you don't, and this is amo
they could actually make a difference with the ballot. >> the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the problem of our continuing confrontation with the muslim world it has undermined the success of president after president. and we cannot continue that way. we have to find a way to overcome that barrier and therefore israel has to see itself in the context of the whole western alliance. >> rose: friedman, rogan, cohen next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the following. >> each day a billion people won't find safe drinking water. around the world we're helping communitites to access clean water. working to improve lives through conservation and education. one drop at a time. >> additional funding for charlie rose was also provided by these funders. . >> and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this was a big week in diplomacy for president oa. last night he returned from a week long visit to asia it took him to j
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
to terrorist organizations, that directly threaten the security of the united states, it is essential that our government agencies are sharing information about such individuals. what happens been in the media these last days about major hasan and his behavior, if determined to be true, is very disturbing. such allegations as justifying suicide bombing on the internet, lecturing fellow soldiers using jihadist rhetoric, warning about adverse events if muslims were not allowed to leave military service, repeatedly seeking counsel from a radical islamic imam with well-known ties to al-qaeda. attempting to convert some of his patients who were suffering from stress disorders to his distorted view of islam and finally, was the fbi sharing with the army what it knew about hasan and aulaqi and was the army sharing what it knew about hasan with the fbi? while these patterns are preliminary and will be confirmed by the the investigations that are being conducted, it is very similar to what we experienced at fort bragg in the late '90s where we were wrongfully tolerating extremists in our organization w
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
that this is not an unending responsibility of the united states without limit. senator lugar pointed out the issue of cost. you know, we have over eight years in iraq and afghanistan under the bush administration not paid for any of those military operations. now that is coming home to reckon in terms of the huge deficit. we have to move forward and support this operation responsibly. but the president -- i think the key to the president's response is laying down a strategy, informing the american public of what's at stake, and i think that when they listen and when they hear, they will be supportive, but it will be a support that has to be continually developed and strengthened going forward. >> you've both mentioned the cost. let me ask you, we're going to talk to chairman david obey of the house proportions committee later in the program. he wants a special war surtax, wants it laid out, so the american people know, here's what's going to pay for iraq and afghanistan. senator reed, to you first, do you support that? do you think it should be broken out separately so the american people get a separate b
in this new media. when somebody stands up in the congress of the united states during the state of the union and said, " ." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did -- "you lie." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did. the civility is not news. we try not to bash the media, hillary. we had an earlier conversation that talk about immigration reform where a truly bipartisan group of senators get together and all slated then, not quite, but there were in large number of democratic and republican senators working on it. that was in 2007. john mccain was simultaneously running for president. he and senator kennedy were the two leaders, the co-authors of the bill. you never saw them together in public however. kennedy said to mccain, look, we cannot show up in tv cameras together or you will lose new hampshire. it is how the press promotes incivility. >> the sense of being in the political minority, the only way you get hurt is to be no easier and more obnoxious. clearly, democrats, we did that -- we talked a lot about this during george bush's presidency. now republicans are doing a t
in dealing with the united states. prime minist yukio hatoyoma s kept that prise, making i clearhat japan will no lo ar how itself t be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especily on the issuef american milary bases. has gtten wasngton's tention, and itsrespect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming, ce again. in night's "lead focus" the presidensanalysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in tokyo, t first stop on a four-nation tour that include siapore, china, south korea. shortly after hi arrival, esident obama met with e japanese primminister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on thetable, o afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in theiralks obama d the prime minister addressed bigges sore spot in u.s./japan relations the pressness of an air base in okinawa. ny are demanding the base be closed with protests taking place before the presidens arrival. both countriewould meet to address japan's concern about the base. >> our goal remains the same, and that's torovide for the defee of ja. with minimal intsion on the lives the people w share the pa. >
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
that was licensed in the united states. we have done those things. we have shifted all the vaccine manufacturing to the extent we can to multi those virus first because there faster to fill, with leaving the rest of leftover for the single dose syringes. we have worked with them to shift everything they can do to get the vaccine out as fast as they possibly can. then we are tracking through the process step by step. to the degree that when a lot is ready to be released at a manufacturer, we have a truck waiting. it pulls up at the loading dock ready to accept that vaccine and bring it to the distribution sites. if we have been working through this every step of the process to get any delays out. that is what a sight visits have largely been about. >> a question about the contracts. [unintelligible] to produce this reject all under 51 million doses, kabbalah contracted the manufacturers to fill 117 million doses. why aren't they able to undo the full amount of doses -- able to do the full amount of doses? >> we need to make sure we have enough vaccine derived the time people want it and being ca
to you first, what is the single biggest challenge for the president of the united states when he speaks to the united states, ed rollins? >> how long we're going to be there and equally as important what is the mission and how is the mission different than it was two years ago or four years ago. dechl democrats have to be convinced the president's party is very divided on this issue. i think he'll have the republican support he needs, but at the end of day, if this is not a bipartisan effort long-term they won't get the resources and funding to make it work. >> donna brazile, to ed rollins' point, the toughest sales job is the anti-war left of the democratic party. how does the president convince them to support him or keep quiet of the criticism? >> public support of the war has diminished across the board not just with the left, across the country and even across the world where we depend on troops from other countries to help us in afghanistan. the president gave a very thorough speech back in march, laying out our objectives. he said it was to dismantle, disrupt and destroy al qaeda
telling the president of the united states no, i don't even want olympia snowe, i'd want one republican supporting health care bill? >> the truth is -- i'm going to disagree right now. free enterprise does not work particularly well in health care and i will tell you why. the administration rate -- >> we don't have insurance companies competing across state lines 3 >> that's the worst thing you could do. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. i will explain why this is. in my state, everybody under 18 has health care. you cannot be refused by any insurance company, no matter what the reason is. everybody gets charged the same. you cannot charge a sick patient who is older more than 20% more than you can charge a young, healthy patient. that has been going on for 15 years. if you could let people buy insurance across state lines, you are making the texas health commissioner be my health commissioner. do you know what the insurance rate is in in texas? 25%. 22% of children have no health insurance in texas. i do not want health commissioner in texas to have anything to do with my health insurance
think if you add up the troops that the united states will commit as well as those that nato countries are going to commit and that's still a work in progress on the latter. i'm told by senior defense officials that general mcchrystal will be more or less satisfied with the number that he believes he needs to do the counterinsurgency campaign that he laid out in his strategic assessment earlier this year. >> suarez: now, it takes a while to get everybody deployed, doesn't it? >> it does. it will take several months, actually several weeks for the first troops. but the marines that you mentioned will be going in first early next year to be followed soon after by a number of... several hundred perhaps up to a thousand army trainers. these will be doing the initial training of afghan recruits. the recruits will then be put into their units and partnered with american units on the ground. this will be a phased deployment going over the next 12 to 18 months. the troops that you mention in your broadcast, up to some 30,000 or so will be phased in over that time frame. >> suarez: once all tho
, it was six world powers that made a move today. delegates from the united states, britain, france, germany, russia and china met in brussels, belgium, and turned up the heat on iran. they didn't discuss the sanctions, not yet anyway, but that possibility served as a backdrop for today's meetings. the issue is iran's nuclear ambitions. tehran says its uranium enrichment program is for peaceful purposes only, but other countries worry it gives iran the capability of making an atomic bomb. despite some optimism in recent weeks, iran now seems to be rejecting a plan to have its uranium enriched outside the country. the delegates in brussels urged iran to reconsider, and hence the talk by president obama and others this week about the possibility of new sanctions. what kind of measures and when, that is our "lead focus" tonight. weeks after iran disclosed the existence of this once-secret nuclear facility near the holy city of qom, in brussels today representatives of the world's major powers pressed iran to accept a plan to curb its nuclear ambitions. the six countries released this statement
number of people in the united states who are related to each other and we just don't know it. >> tonight the woman who uncovered michelle obama's family ties will give us more detail and dig into my own roots. >> this, for example, is your grandmother. >>> this is your only source for news, cnn prime time begins now. here's campbell brown. >>> hi there, everybody. we start tonight, as always, with the mashup. we're watching it all so you don't have to and tonight after weeks of debate at the white house about what to do in afghanistan, the president has made a decision. the pentagon right now is drawing up plans to send about 34,000 u.s. troops to afghanistan and what that means is that young men and women from around the country will be packing up and shipping out very soon. president obama is expected to make the official announcement next tuesday in a prime time address. >> it is my intention to finish the job, and i feel confident when the american people hear a clear rationale for what we're doing there and how we intend to achieve our goals that they will be supportive. >> i antici
it from europe, you see it from the united states and you see it from asia. tell me what you see. >> well, i see a very different situation. in europe there is no recovery and i think 2010's going to be a mediocre year in europe. same thing in japan. we don't see any recovery. we see resistance to the decline but no recovery. in the united states, things look more promising for the short term. you know, after a very large chop in the economy and particularly in the automobile industry. >> rose: but generally those impressions you just said are about the economy overall. >> yeah, but the economy overall we see slight growth in 2010. but a situation very different from one country to the other. >> rose: at what point in an economic recovery do consumers think about automobiles? >> well, you know, it depends where the consumer is. if he's in china or in brazil or india, he's thinking all the time about automobiles. what's the best opportunity? what's the best deal? and we're seeing these sales booming all the time. you know, no matter what. now, in that time, you have an increase of 5% or 10
the united states and india have not always been one. during the cold war, many saw india as unfriendly, which it might have been. during -- at the end of the cold war, there were opportunities to securitized. in the past several years, there has been a lifting of sanctions culminating in the historic civil nuclear accord. now, there@@@@@@h@ @ @ @ @ @ @ r strategic partnership. there is a need for wide ranging consultation to in grain habits of consultation -- to ingrain minister for being here. i want to welcome his entire delegation, including his most able ambassador and want to thank the gentleman standing here, lee hamilton, who is president and director of the woodrow wilson international center. i could not be more pleased to introduce the prime minister. lee hamilton resented the ninth district in the u.s. house of representatives and he is a model of what a legislator of to be. -- ought to be. congressman hamilton? [applause] >> good evening to you all and thank you for coming. i told the prime minister a moment ago that he was appearing before an extraordinary washington audie
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
is it when a united states citizen is declared disabled they have to wait time before they can get medicaid or medicare? host: 8 collar like that, better worse off? -- a caller like that. . guest: there are obviously community health clinics and other medical facilities that provide medical care cheaply or, in the cases of need, for free. i'm not minimizing the collar's husband's typical. i am sure -- caller's husband's difficulty. but there is health care available in the country for people who cannot afford to pay. ad. caller: good morning, michigan. host: michigan. i'm sorry. caller: i just wanted to say the last time i checked, unemployment was 19.5%, and my husband, who just had his 29th anniversary at the company he worked at has been laid off and is losing his mind. i would be crying if i thought it would do any good, but it will not. he is doing everything he can to find a job. as soon as he sees something in the newspaper, he goes there. he is so talented, he can fix anything, but he is 65 years old, too, and that is a problem. a few weeks ago, senator lugar? he was on "newsmakers"
is mmitted tohe effort in ahanistan. they're waiting, like the rest of the world i, the united states andhrough president obama to announc our ientions and our way forward. but they have a deep unrstanding of why this is portant for nato, why this important for the larger international communit ani think that given the right meures of accounbility that we need to be seeking from presidenkarzai and his government, we're goingto see a commitment n just from germany but fromany ofur nato allies. >> rose: mightthey makeup whever the gap is between what general mcchrystals seeking and what the united stes is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, ihink we have to wa for th president's announcement. buwe will be, as we have been, consulting very deeplyur ales and talng about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civian strategy. cause, remember it's not ju out troops on theground, it's about making sur that the people of afghastan see the results ofhis efft. that they ha more faithin their own governments of... as an enty thatan deliverfor em.
but there is no question that commercial property in the united states is in bad shape it is going down. and there is a lot of genuine worries about that. dubai as a symbol might focus more attention next week but i think dubai is postly about emerging markets. our home problems are very much about the united states and they are very big and they are much bigger, actually, than the problems in dubai. >> warner: so the u.s. problems you think are a lot bigger. >> the total losses from the crisis so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talking about credit losses in dubai of perhaps $20 billion. so that an order of magnitude, two orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have seen in the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200, 300 billion but they are coming on top of all these existing problems. they are coming into a banking system that is weak already in the united states. >> warner: so briefly do we have reason to be nervous by what happened today in dubai. >> yes, it should make us nervous. came at an ago waurd
hnology is more important than ever in driving the united states economy and also 33 percent saying united states will be the global tech leader and a lot of americans think we will not. why is that? >> there's good reason to be concerned. it's not so much that america's innovation pro west is lagging but that the rest of the world is catching us. the recession has not helped with unemployment at ten percent we have good minds not contributing to the economy and we've seen anybody incorporate america has seen a lot of projects and r and d spending cut back as companies try to trim costs as their top line as shrunk so the survey captures the notion that both in the long-term and short-term there's things to be concerned about. > the first paragraph of the story says by most measures, america remains the world leader in technology achievement. consider the 2009 nobel prize winners of the 13 people honored nine were america's. not bad, right? >> but the nobel is a lagging indicator that people earn that typically at the end of their career for work that took place in many cases years and years pri
. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this week hearings and investigations began into the massacre of 13 soldiers at ft. hood, texas. the number one question, why didn't anyone in charge see it coming? i spoke about that with congressman pete hoekstra, he's the ranking member of the house intelligence committee. congressman, thanks very much for coming in. i know you're getting ready to catch a flight. are you satisfied with the answers you're getting so far from the executive branch of the u.s. government whether the pentagon or the administration, the army, as far as this investigation is concerned? >> no, wolf, i'm really not. and i think i probably share some of the same frustrations that senator lieberman has. i applaud the senate for holding public hearings. i hold them -- i applaud them for doing the hearings. there's no indication at all that that's going to take place on the house side. and i think they really do have to take place. you know, we had a briefing today, but way too o
is the optimal solution to provide necessary medical treatment to everyone and the united states in a way that controls health care costs. pnhp doesn't, however, take a position on how congress members should vote on the legislation that is currently proceeding for congress. we do provide information to members about whether the legislation is likely to be ctive, and how icompes to a national single payer health care system. we joined the many health care reform advocates across the nation who are disappointed by the health insurance reform legislation that is passing through congress. we, like you, are seriously concerned by the health care environment in the united states. we are saddened by the number of people, our patience, family and friends who are donner and because they cannot receive or for access to health care. we are saddened by the number of people facing bankruptcy or foreclosure of their homes and those who are suffering needlessly because they cannot afford or have access to medical treatment. the anticipated a health care debate this year that would focus on the trees st
, flexible regulation the united states had the best economy in the world. only in the last 20, since we decided that government was always the problem, have we done. i think the search for thoughtful, reasonable regulation is exactly what we need. spl of that regulation may only be registration. i think a fair amount of it might be so that we will know where the pools of money are that are investing in our country and commage the way we were. i think it is reasonable, i think it is thoughtful, and i think it is easy to find. >> mr. pagliuca. >> i think what happened was a direct result of us not having appropriate regulation and enforcement. the crisis was caused by banks that decided they would take short-term risks to make long-term profits, and not long-term profits. we got over-extended. swayings like i.a.g. put this whole country at risk. so i come out with a plan. you can go to my web site and see this plan. it calls for a strong central regulator. it is not unlike what we did after 9-11 to coordinate various bodies. second, it must be national. if we have laxed regulations in one
the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists, and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> india and america are separated by distance but bound together by the values of democracy, rule of law and respect for fundamental human freedoms. >> reporter: there's also some hard cash involved in this. american businesses are looking at india and seeing dollar signs because as you look at their infrastructure rebuilding, ports, airports, roads, etc., the chamber of commerce predicts they could over the next five years, u.s. companies could make $500 billion. this is also a good deal. >> what do both sides get out of this state visit? >> reporter: i think the united states gives india what it wants which is recognition that it is a very important country in the world right now, that in spite of
of the united states. interestingly, in the case from 1960, the case of private bennett, the last person to be executed, president eisenhower had approved his sentence and approved the execution in the late 1950's. by the time inauguration day came around in 1961, bennett was still alive. the question was presented a second time, this time to president kennedy, as to whether the execution should go forward. president kennedy obviously did not stop it. >> recently, since that execution, the five folks that have been on death row, there has only been one that was approved. that was in 2008 by president bush. that is the great case. -- that is the gray case. it is going through the civil habeas review. that is the one that is farthest along the line. >> [unintelligible] >> one of the issues that you see is that several of these cases have been appealed. in the process, they have been appealed and overturned. one sentence was recently committed. he had a death sentence and then he was sentenced to life without parole. there are several capital cases. five have gone to the appellate process a
into office on a promise of change. including asserting greater independence in dealing with the united states. prime minister yukio hatoyoma has kept that promise, making it clear that japan will no longer allow itself to be treated as a rubber stamp for u.s. policy, especially on the issue of american military bases. he has gotten washington's attention, and its respect. and by today, relations seemed to be warming once again. in tonight's "lead focus" the president's analysis of u.s./japanese relation. president obama arrived in japan friday afternoon, tokyo time, the first stop on a four-nation tour that will include singapore, china and south korea. shortly after his arrival, president obama met with the japanese prime minister, yukio hatoyoma. among the issues on the table, afghanistan, north korea and global warming. in their talks, obama and the prime minister addressed biggest sore spot in u.s./japan relations -- the presence of an air base on okinawa. many japanese are demanding that the base be closed, with protests takin place prior to obama's visit. after today's talks the two lea
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